Red Barn

Historical Landmark

General Information: Shrewsbury Street and Wachusett Street
,
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No Smoking
Description:

Interest Areas: Crafts, Education, Environment / Nature, History / Heritage, Hobbies, Music / Singing, Architecture, Animals

The Red Barn was built in the mid-19th century
for Winslow Fairbanks (18001880) on Fairbanks
Farm, where he lived with his wife, Maria Knowlton
Fairbanks (18091890), and their two children. The farm
remained in the family for two generations and was
considered one of the best and most productive farms
in Holden. Worcester Polytechnic Institute acquired
the Fairbanks Farm in the 1920s to supplement the
landholdings of its nearby Alden Hydraulic Laboratory.
Alden Lab used the barn for storage and the Fairbanks
farmhouse, which stood in front of the barn, served as
housing for WPI Civil Engineering students attending
summer programs. The farmhouse was demolished in
about 1938.
In 1994, after Alden Lab became a private enterprise,
WPI sold 14.6 acres to Rutland builder Clealand Blair, Sr.
Blair subdivided part of the land for houses and in February
of 2000 gave the barn and 7.7 acres to a non-profit
organization, The Friends of the Red Barn, Inc. With many
improvements to the barn and grounds now complete,
the Friends invite the public to join in the fun at Farm
Days that highlight agriculture and farm life.

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Last Modified: November 27, 2008 at 2:51 PM